CS AlignEd

K-12 Computer Science Pathway

NMSI's CS AlignEd

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Students pursuing every college major and career need knowledge of computer science. And yet, a small minority of U.S. schools provide these courses. In those few schools with computer science courses, young women and students of color are significantly underrepresented.

NMSI’s K-12 Computer Science support model, called CS AlignEd, provides support for teachers, students, administrators and counselors. This collaborative approach allows for better across-the-board CS support in schools, which ultimately contributes to student achievement.
What is CS AlignEd?
 
  • District planning to develop a rigorous, inclusive and sustainable computer science pathway that works for all students in the district
  • High-quality computer science professional development and support throughout the year
  • Vertical teams training and implementation resources to ensure curricular cohesion across all grade levels

The NMSI-led K-12 computer science coalition includes the following partners:

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Next Steps
Contact your NMSI representative or email customerservice@nms.org to learn more and apply.

Looking for CS supports in Texas? Check out our Lone Star CS program.

 


“I volunteered to take on the venture [AP Computer Science] because I believe in it, and I believe in NMSI. Even from the short presentation early on, I’ve believed in NMSI. We got a ton of resources, and those resources are going to turn into achievement.” 

Kevin Gallagher, AP Computer Science teacher, Keystone Oaks High School, Pittsburgh


“As a high school counselor, I thought, ‘How is this related to me?’” But this truly was for counselors and explained computer science from beginning to end. I came in with no knowledge of computer science, and now, I have a good foundation to go back and talk to my students and team to promote it in our school.”

school counselor attending a NMSI Computer Science Summer Institute with NCWIT

“Computer science is now as important as reading.”

Sarah Jenevein, project coordinator, UTeach Computer Science